Archive for the ‘link’ Category

security or privacy? both please!

Monday, July 11th, 2011

Hello readers, fellow bloggers, fell trolls… it’s been a while.

Happy Wheel

If you didn’t know that just following a link could lead to loss of your identity, virus infection and the unknowing participation in denial of service sieges, distribution of child pornography and letting attackers break through your company’s firewalls (not to mention immanentizing the eschaton), you could be forgiven for not paying attention to the happy happy field of information security.

If you knew this rather distressing fact about the web of links, but thought you could defend with an up-to-date antivirus, a current browser and the avoidance of “shady” websites I would hate to prick your bubble by telling you regular honest websites are being used against us, browsers all have to run the all-singing-all-dancing-all-executing flash and jave and anti-virus is not only ineffective but doesn’t even target this type of attacks. Knowing these things might be a little distressing so I won’t tell you.

At least my bank is secure, you say, it’s got SSL and everything! Well, you’d be twisting my arm into telling you, embarassedly, that SSL as implemented in browsers is very neatly broken, that all we needed was one of the Certified Trusted Authority Parties to go bad for us all to wake up with a butt-ache, but we now have not one but at least three such bad parties, not to mention all the MiM magic and DNS trickery that you don’t want to hear about anyway.

I will tell you however that the only defense is two-pronged: not allowing websites to script – which is a pain – and damage containment, which is not exactly perfect.

Let us say you already knew all of this, but no longer cared because there was an even greater danger on the web: the total breach of containment of privacy that is social media and tracking cookies which all want to integrate and track your every move through the web so that usage and mood patterns can be profiled, tracked, bought and sold. Doesn’t matter, right? You’re logged in to Facebook, Linkedin and Google+ and get all your links from there, so you have your own personal filter which only shows you stuff you care about, turning your blind eye towards anything you need to know that comes from left field, suckering you into giving away your privates every time you hit “like” or “add to friends list”.
pacman ghost

In a post-panopticlick world there is really only one lesson to be learned: care about your privacy, because noone else will give a damn. It’s not about whether you have anything to hide, it’s about the accumultion of your private info by crooks to use as they please!

Oh and crooks include the great people at Facebook, Microsoft and Google, that’s why I recommend disabling all tracking features that come in the guise of “better speed” or “increased security”. Pictures below show how to do it in chromium and firefox.

chromium dialog, how to disable google tracking

Ok that was Goggle’s Chromium – note all the unchecked- checkboxen… disabling prefetch, malware blocklists and suggestion services, all of which are sending far too much data to Google’s scaredy-ass all seeing eye. Aaaand here’s Firefox:

fuckfox prefetch prevention

Mhm that’s pointing the browser at about:config, searching for prefetch and setting it to false. Yep.

Those pictures show you how to find and set better privacy features in your browser. Safari users are up shit creek, but unlike the Internet Explorer users, they at least have a paddle! Great stuff, what next?

Keep a “secure” browser to browse with that you don’t log into anything personal with.. and make this your default browser!

What is a “secure” browser? Let’s talk a little about that without insulting anyone’s intelligence, shall we?
First off, I’m putting the word “secure” in uhm qoutes, because uhm the browser will never be secure, be it ever so protected. Ok, moving on you want to be running noscript and or adblock and or disconnect and or noflash, depending on whether you are a Mac, Windows (but then you are at game over already) or Linux user with Firefox or Chromium (NOT IExploder, that shit is scary!).

All of these tools make it so the sites you visit don’t get to run code on your machine. The end result is that sites are marginally less usable, but that popup popunder popver poopop ads and scary tracker/botnet/mal stuff doesn’t run automagically. Here are some links:
noscript
adblock
disconnect
Flashblock
– Have you heard about sandboxing?

java and flash denied in chromium Chromium is getting the right idea by killing java and flash from the get-go. This should be the default, but you have to make it so!

You should definitely be cloaking your user-agent, as it is a useless yet very telling string your browser hoes out to all. Do this with the User-Agent Modifying Extension.

Also, you may find Torbutton and Foxyproxy interesting, the real privacy is in bouncing your traffic thru things that wash it for you. Putty or any other decent ssh client will create a proxy for you:

`ssh -D8080 me@myshellserver`

and you can point your browser’s SOCKS proxy settings to localhost:8080 putting all your traffic through your shell server!

sshnuke

The best has yet to come mua ha ha ha.

Free society conference – my experience

Tuesday, November 9th, 2010

Until the very last minutes I was unsure whether I’d make it to FSCONS, the Free Society Conference and Nordic Summit. I did not know what to think of it, despite gentle pushings from one set to speak at the conference. Three days later and with the event somewhat filtered in my mind, there is no doubt that it was well worth the opportunity costs and then some.

I'm going to FSCONS 2010!

My first impressions while browsing the event programme were that there was no way to attend all the interesting talks! An insurmountable problem, and I hadn’t even gotten there: my meat could not be in two to three places at the same time, while my mind could not rationally choose away interesting unknowns.. so I opted to leave it to a vague notion of chance and intent.

What I hadn’t expected was the powerful impact that the people attending would have on me. Cyber heroes and heroines, freedom fighters, game changers, inventors, uncelebrated cryptoanarchists and everything makers were some of those that I got to know, that engaged me in dialogue, that dared discuss openly some (most?) of the hardest problems that we, the world, are facing today. With the full intent to do something about these problems.

(more…)

backtrack to install a backtrack

Thursday, September 9th, 2010

BackTrack is your daddy.
BackTrack accepts no compromises, yet it is all compromising.
Because really, when is the last time you *didn’t* need those auditing tools? That penetration suite? Total privacy to break other people’s privacy? All that and a packet of crisps wrapped with razor sharp menus – it’s the kind of stuff you can only dream of on core. And I hear Fedora Core is the shitzitz now, adopting new [1] and exciting[2] features. Oh hey debian doesn’t have binary deltas for packages *yet* [3], but we’ve been talking about it way longer than those dudes have.

Anecdtotally, I spilled a glass of water on my laptop the other day. Naturally, the glass went half empty in an instant: my poor lovely x41, I screamed. As it turns out the laptop casing made sure all the water was rather cleverly funneled into the x41′s only 1.8″ harddrive, which proceeded to go completely bananas (due presumably to rust, because clean water doesn’t conduct, right?). The data? I believe trusty old dd_rescue did rescue at least part of it, but I then misplaced the image file somewhere.

The system?
It was a thrifty, untrusted yet trusty Windows XP install that I’d been keeping on there on the mercy of actually booting every time since I bought the machine despite having been licked by more than its fair share of virii, malignant updates and accidental hard resets. Most of the programs I ran were portable[4] versions so all I lost were some documents and lots of music[5].

The hardware?
I disassembled and metricuously dried every little component, and in the end only the disk drive was bust. The 1.8″ IDE drive that is impossibly ridiculously expensive to replace (5$ per GB? What the foo? Shut up!). Still, I needed the laptop so I exploded booting from USB. Despite (misguided?) efforts I haven’t bloody well been able to boot windows off USB, so I bootstrapped BackTrack 3 instead and bob is your uncle.

I mean really, I think I had that thing running like that for three months before I started missing stuff like apt. Didn’t really mind starting fresh every boot, I even invented a whole little schpiel for getting online as fast as possible, none of that Network Manager madness.
Persistent settings are all right in BT3 but booting into RAM is a lot more fun. After the first 3 seconds of boot you can pull the USB plug, everything goes zippety fast and your footprint is nada. Only thing that can get your ass is a cold boot attack.

BT3 is real cool and still a good recommend if you want to wardrive and do proper wifi phreaking due to the embedded injection drivers, but in the end I wanted new libs, a decent compiler and window dressing, and so I rolled BackTrack 4.

Granted, kde sucks, but if I cared enough I’d switch to openbox or something awesome in like 4 minutes. These days all I need is a shell and a browser.

For those of you fortunate enough to have a harddrive, BT4 ships with an install script to turn your system into a permanent BackTrack fixture. It’s based off Ubiquity, but dd’ing off the USB and onto your disk drive might be better if you’re interested in being able to boot your system into RAM, well I dunno because you want to do some advanced powersaving[6], or want to kill your system without worrying about unclean shutdowns, or want to maximise the life span of your solid-state device by nearly never writing to it.

For my own part there was a happy ending on DealExtreme, as they ship IDE44 to CompactFlash interfaces that fit in the x41 1.8″ bay… which leads to a whole slew of unexplored possibilities thaaat (drum rolls) I will explore in the next installment of how to break your machine.

BackTrack 4 R1 has released :-) [6]. Anyone know where I can score the BlackHat Edition?

[1] http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/FeaturePresto
[2] http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/systemd
[3] http://samba.anu.edu.au/rsync/rsync-and-debian/rsync-and-debian.html
[4] http://portableapps.com/
[5] http://drownedinsound.com/community/boards/music/4179554
[6] http://kacper.blog.linpro.no/archives/13
[7] http://www.backtrack-linux.org/

the important bits

Monday, March 16th, 2009

instead of giving you another machine-breaking tip I’ll just point you to http://www.bsd-box.net/ where you’ll find writ a collection for your reading pleasure…