Archive for September, 2010

CPM 0.25 :: new packages

Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

sup peeps,
your favorite password managment program, CPM, now has updated packages.
What’s new in these packages is a working create-cpmdb. A fix for setting the SUID bit is also included, and that will allow CPM to store passwords securely in memory as well as on disk.

Ubuntu and Debian users:
Get cpm_0.25~beta-2debian3_amd64.deb directly from github.

I have also taken the opportunity to update the documentation, which will allow you to roll your own CPM should you be running something other than debian.

Quick start:

me@mine:~# apt-get install libcdk5 libcrack2 libdotconf1.0 libgpg-error0 libgpgme11 libncursesw5 libxml2 libxml2-utils zlib1g
me@mine:~# dpkg -i cpm_0.25~beta-2debian3_amd64.deb

You need: a GPG key and 3 minutes of your time. Create the password database (only once):

me@mine:~$ create-cpmdb

Use your GPG key to encrypt the database. This puts a .cpmdb file in your home folder.

Run CPM and add your passwords! Exit by hitting ESC to save the keys.

me@mine:~$ cpm

and you have a working CPM install.

Furthermore, I have devised a way for many people to share the same passoword database through a revision control system. Take a look at CPM::revision control.

backtrack to install a backtrack

Thursday, September 9th, 2010

BackTrack is your daddy.
BackTrack accepts no compromises, yet it is all compromising.
Because really, when is the last time you *didn’t* need those auditing tools? That penetration suite? Total privacy to break other people’s privacy? All that and a packet of crisps wrapped with razor sharp menus – it’s the kind of stuff you can only dream of on core. And I hear Fedora Core is the shitzitz now, adopting new [1] and exciting[2] features. Oh hey debian doesn’t have binary deltas for packages *yet* [3], but we’ve been talking about it way longer than those dudes have.

Anecdtotally, I spilled a glass of water on my laptop the other day. Naturally, the glass went half empty in an instant: my poor lovely x41, I screamed. As it turns out the laptop casing made sure all the water was rather cleverly funneled into the x41′s only 1.8″ harddrive, which proceeded to go completely bananas (due presumably to rust, because clean water doesn’t conduct, right?). The data? I believe trusty old dd_rescue did rescue at least part of it, but I then misplaced the image file somewhere.

The system?
It was a thrifty, untrusted yet trusty Windows XP install that I’d been keeping on there on the mercy of actually booting every time since I bought the machine despite having been licked by more than its fair share of virii, malignant updates and accidental hard resets. Most of the programs I ran were portable[4] versions so all I lost were some documents and lots of music[5].

The hardware?
I disassembled and metricuously dried every little component, and in the end only the disk drive was bust. The 1.8″ IDE drive that is impossibly ridiculously expensive to replace (5$ per GB? What the foo? Shut up!). Still, I needed the laptop so I exploded booting from USB. Despite (misguided?) efforts I haven’t bloody well been able to boot windows off USB, so I bootstrapped BackTrack 3 instead and bob is your uncle.

I mean really, I think I had that thing running like that for three months before I started missing stuff like apt. Didn’t really mind starting fresh every boot, I even invented a whole little schpiel for getting online as fast as possible, none of that Network Manager madness.
Persistent settings are all right in BT3 but booting into RAM is a lot more fun. After the first 3 seconds of boot you can pull the USB plug, everything goes zippety fast and your footprint is nada. Only thing that can get your ass is a cold boot attack.

BT3 is real cool and still a good recommend if you want to wardrive and do proper wifi phreaking due to the embedded injection drivers, but in the end I wanted new libs, a decent compiler and window dressing, and so I rolled BackTrack 4.

Granted, kde sucks, but if I cared enough I’d switch to openbox or something awesome in like 4 minutes. These days all I need is a shell and a browser.

For those of you fortunate enough to have a harddrive, BT4 ships with an install script to turn your system into a permanent BackTrack fixture. It’s based off Ubiquity, but dd’ing off the USB and onto your disk drive might be better if you’re interested in being able to boot your system into RAM, well I dunno because you want to do some advanced powersaving[6], or want to kill your system without worrying about unclean shutdowns, or want to maximise the life span of your solid-state device by nearly never writing to it.

For my own part there was a happy ending on DealExtreme, as they ship IDE44 to CompactFlash interfaces that fit in the x41 1.8″ bay… which leads to a whole slew of unexplored possibilities thaaat (drum rolls) I will explore in the next installment of how to break your machine.

BackTrack 4 R1 has released :-) [6]. Anyone know where I can score the BlackHat Edition?

[1] http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/FeaturePresto
[2] http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/systemd
[3] http://samba.anu.edu.au/rsync/rsync-and-debian/rsync-and-debian.html
[4] http://portableapps.com/
[5] http://drownedinsound.com/community/boards/music/4179554
[6] http://kacper.blog.linpro.no/archives/13
[7] http://www.backtrack-linux.org/

pulse audio: an experiment in social engineering

Tuesday, September 7th, 2010

The title about sums up the sentiments on the topic in my department.
What’s the use case for pulse audio?

Apparently, pulse audio is:
* configurationless consumer audio
* something that sits between you and your sound
* a replacement for ESD
* necessary for normal printer(!) operation
* cross-platform and works on windows
* really really complex
* the shit when you want less usability
* the bomb when you want less security
* not really competing with jack
* really good at marketing itself
* on by default in most current distros.

The cure:
apt-get remove –purge pulseaudio\*
yum remove pulseaudio